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Officials set for international duty at home

Thirty-six referees and linespersons earn assignments to Langley, Delta, Cornwall and Bridgewater

Jason La Rose
|
November 01, 2022

As Hockey Canada’s fall events return for the first time since 2019, the officials are ready to hit the ice.

Thirty-six officials – 17 referees and 19 linespersons – from across the country have been selected for the World Under-17 Hockey Challenge, World Junior A Challenge and Para Hockey Cup.

“Our fall events are a great opportunity for individuals participating in our Officiating Program of Excellence,” said Dan Hanoomansingh, manager of officiating with Hockey Canada. “These officials have worked hard to sharpen their skills since their last opportunity at one of our camps. We have been tracking their progression and they have earned their opportunity to officiate these exciting events.”

The Officiating Program of Excellence (OPOE) is the pathway through which Canadian officials are selected for top national and international tournaments. The objectives of the OPOE are to provide a clear developmental pathway for aspiring elite officials, provide developmentally appropriate coaching for elite officials, prepare officials for national and international competitions, and assist Hockey Canada in making evidence-based decisions for assignments.

For more information about the Hockey Canada Officiating Program, visit HockeyCanada.ca/Officials.

World Under-17 Hockey Challenge (Langley & Delta, B.C.)

Name (Hometown) Member Role
Nick Arcan (Thornton, Ont.) Ontario Hockey Federation Linesperson
Cédric Beaudet (Bécancour, Que.)
Hockey Quebec Referee
Mathieu Boudreau (Gatineau, Que.) Hockey Quebec Referee
Sam Currie (Masstown, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia Referee
Tanner Doiron (Bedeque, P.E.I.) Hockey PEI Referee
Maxime Ferland (Ste-Catherine, Que.) Hockey Quebec Linesperson
Mitchell Gibbs (Coquitlam, B.C.) BC Hockey Linesperson
Antoine Huot (Mirabel, Que.) Hockey Quebec Linesperson
Connor McCracken (Chilliwack, B.C.) BC Hockey
Referee
Garrett Merrill (Bedford, N.S.) Hockey Eastern Ontario Linesperson
Harrison O'Pray (Moncton, N.B.) Hockey New Brunswick Referee
Tristan Peacock (Ayr, Ont.) Ontario Hockey Federation Linesperson
David-Daniel Pendleton (Dieppe, N.B.) Hockey New Brunswick
Linesperson
Kyle Rodgers (Waterloo, Ont.) Ontario Hockey Federation Linesperson
Matthew Scott (Toronto, Ont.) Ontario Hockey Federation
Referee
Ty Skene (Prince Albert, Sask.) Hockey Saskatchewan Referee

The officiating coaches for the World Under-17 Hockey Challenge are Dan Hanoomansingh (Vancouver, B.C.) and Kirk Wood (Stratford, Ont.).

World Junior A Challenge (Cornwall, Ont.)

Name (Hometown) Member Role
Taylor Burzminski (St. Albert, Alta.) Hockey Alberta Referee
Dominic Cadieux (Saint-Constant, Que.) Hockey Quebec Referee
Danny Emerson (Belleville, Ont.) Ontario Hockey Federation Referee
Jérémy Faucher (Cowansville, Que.)
Hockey Quebec Linesperson
Andre Grougrou (Burlington, Ont.) Ontario Hockey Federation Linesperson
Anthony Lapointe (Verdun, Que.) Hockey Quebec Linesperson
Nick Melanson (Moncton, N.B.) Hockey New Brunswick Referee
Shawn Oliver (Ottawa, Ont.) Hockey Eastern Ontario Linesperson
Tim Plamondon (Kelowna, B.C.) BC Hockey Linesperson
Alex Robichaud (Dieppe, N.B.) Hockey New Brunswick
Referee

The officiating coach for the World Junior A Challenge is Hanoomansingh.

Para Hockey Cup (Bridgewater, N.S.)

Name (Hometown) Member Role
Blaise Curry (Bedford, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia Referee
Dylan Dauphinee (Lunenburg, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Linesperson
Corey Hayne (Antigonish, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Referee
Nick MacIsaac (Judique, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Linesperson
Brad Murray (Bridgewater, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Linesperson
Chris Newell (Chebucto, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Referee
Ryan O'Rourke (Yarmouth, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Linesperson
Jane Ogilvie (Truro, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Linesperson
Chris Palk (Sackville, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Referee
Drake Robinson (Timberlea, N.S.) Hockey Nova Scotia
Referee

The officiating coach for the Para Hockey Cup is Paul Boese (Arnprior, Ont.)

Clarke continues to climb the ranks

From small-town Drake to the Olympic Winter Games, Alex Clarke has broken barriers and inspired young officials on what has been a unique hockey journey

Jonathan Yue
|
April 08, 2024

If it wasn’t for a disgruntled cow, Alex Clarke might not have become one of the best and most respected officials in the world.

It was the spring of 2015 and Clarke (then going by her maiden name, Alex Blair) had just been drafted 53rd overall by the Calgary Inferno of the now-defunct Canadian Women’s Hockey League when was she kicked by a cow on her family farm, resulting in a lingering knee injury.

"I wasn't able to properly train throughout the summer. So, the decision was kind of made for me not to go to [Inferno training] camp and try out that fall,” recalls Clarke, who played three seasons with the Weyburn Gold Wings of the Saskatchewan Female U18 AAA Hockey League (SFU18AAAHL) before playing NCAA Division III hockey at the College of St. Scholastica in Minnesota.

But when the door on Clarke's playing career closed, another opened.

"I knew I wanted to stay involved in hockey," she recalls. "I had previously thought that maybe coaching was a good avenue for me, but at the time I was 22 years old and my personality just doesn't fit well with standing on a bench and being tied to a team schedule. So, I ended up pursuing officiating instead."

Since then, Clarke has skyrocketed through the officiating ranks. A native of Drake, Saskatchewan (population 197), she has worked in her home province in the SFU18AAAHL and Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL), nationally at the Esso Cup and internationally at the IIHF Women's World Championship.

In 2021 she became the first woman to officiate in the Western Hockey League (she also was the first woman to work a WHL game as a referee earlier this season) and on Dec. 5, 2021 she became the first woman to work a game in the American Hockey League.

“My love for the game is what inspires me to get out there,” Clarke says about being an official. “It's a place where I get to go and forget about everything else that’s going on. I get to have fun. I get to be with friends.

“Since I've had success, and I've been a little bit more recognized, it means a lot more to me to go out there and know that I'm somebody that people see as a trailblazer as the only female in certain leagues.”

The past few years in particular have been quiet the ride for Clarke, who reached the pinnacle of international hockey when she worked as a linesperson at the 2022 Olympic Winter Games in Beijing, and earlier this year she began calling games in the new Professional Women’s Hockey League (PWHL). Most recently, she officiated the PWHL 3-on-3 Showcase during the NHL All-Star Weekend in Toronto.

“It’s felt natural,” Clarke says of her progression as an official. “Aside from the 2021-22 season where I jumped around lot of leagues at the same time, its very similar to being a player. Being scouted [and] evaluated, and when I was ready to be put into the next level, I was ready and determined to be capable. I’ve had a lot of good experiences and never felt like I was over my head.”

Inspiring the next generation

While her pathway to becoming an official was a certainly unique, Clarke says she wouldn’t have chosen any other scenario.

“[When I was looking into getting into officiating,]Hockey Saskatchewan was really good,” Clarke recalls. “They welcomed me with open arms. After knowing my hockey background, they invited me to a referee camp and when I arrived, they were so welcoming and immediately felt like part of the family.”

As an official, Clarke hopes to show that there are many pathways to being involved in hockey and she hopes to have the opportunity to mentor more young officials.

“Anybody that’s looking to get into officiating, I would say go into it with open eyes and an open perspective,” Clarke says. “I went in for the love of the game and the desire to improve and take feedback, and it’s probably going to take you places that you probably didn’t expect.”

With the growth of women’s hockey over the last few years, Clarke has realized the importance of being a role model on the ice, even as an official. Clarke believes the added spotlight on women’s hockey thanks to the PWHL is making a huge difference.

“I have a four-and-a-half-year-old daughter, and she’s really starting to be impressionable,” says Clarke, who also has a young son. “This season, I brought the family with me to the NHL All-Star Game, and to see her reaction and having her talk about Natalie Spooner and Sarah Nurse, she wants to be around hockey. She has so much more interest and investment in it because she’s seeing other women as great examples.

“I think it just resonates with a lot of people and little girls and boys are now able to see women and moms and full-grown adults out on the ice and in the arenas, you just get a sense of equality for everybody to achieve those goals.”



As more and more leagues, such as the AHL, include women officials, Clarke hopes to continue the push for women to take the next step. With her experience at NHL All-Star Weekend, Clarke believes we could be seeing women referees in NHL games soon.

“Getting a female into the NHL, it may be two years away, it may be 10 years away, but if I can help play a role in getting a female there, whether that’s me or somebody I can mentor and develop and inspire to take that next step, I think that’s helping progress female officials as a whole, I’m looking to have an impact on the next generation.”

Aside from that, Clarke’s long-term goal is to be at the 2026 Olympic Games in Milan, Italy. But for now, her eyes are set on the 2024 IIHF Women’s World Championships in Utica, New York.

“I want to earn a spot to be in the gold medal game,” Clarke says. “We as officials are competing out there and we want to earn that gold medal spot too. Ultimately, I want to have fun and better myself and the people around me.”

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Officials selected for 2024 U SPORTS championships

Hockey Canada names 26 officials for men’s and women’s national championships

Dan Hanoomansingh
|
March 12, 2024

Twenty-six officials – 13 referees and 13 linespersons – have been selected by Hockey Canada for the U SPORTS championship tournaments.

The tournaments will run concurrently from March 14-17, with the men’s University Cup taking place in Toronto and the Women’s Hockey Championship taking place in Saskatoon.

The 2024 championships will feature a veteran crew in stripes, with a wealth of experience at the domestic and international levels. The roster for the men’s tournament is headlined by referee Mark Pearce (North Vancouver, BC) who refereed the gold medal games at the 2022 U Cup and 2024 IIHF World Junior Championship. The roster for the women’s championship led by Olympic officials Alexandra Clarke (Drake, SK), Stéphanie Gagnon (Princeville, QC) and Cianna Lieffers (Cudworth, SK).

“Hockey Canada would like to congratulate all the officials on their selection to the USPORTS championships,” said Dan Hanoomansingh, manager of officiating with Hockey Canada. “Our university championships provide top-tier amateur competition, in a challenging, single-elimination tournament. These officials are at the top of the amateur game and continued to hone their craft throughout the season to be ready for this event.”

Name Member Role
Men's University Cup (Toronto, ON)
Nick Albinati BC Hockey Linesperson
Nick Arcan Ontario Hockey Federation Linesperson
Birkhoff Birkhoff Ontario Hockey Federation Linesperson
Josh DeYoung Hockey Nova Scotia Referee
Danny Emerson Ontario Hockey Federation Referee
Maxime Ferland Hockey Québec Linesperson
Jesse Gour Hockey Québec Referee
Troy Murray Hockey Saskatchewan Referee
Mark Pearce BC Hockey Referee
Luke Pye Ontario Hockey Federation Linesperson
Women's Hockey Championship (Saskatoon, SK)
Ali Beres OWHA Linesperson
Jennifer Berezowski OWHA Referee
Melissa Brunn BC Hockey Linesperson
Hayley Butz Hockey Alberta Referee
Alexandra Clarke Hockey Saskatchewan Linesperson
Marie-Éve Couture Hockey Québec Referee
Brandy Dewar OWHA Referee
Stéphanie Gagnon Hockey Québec Linesperson
Audrey-Anne Girard Hockey Québec Referee
Laura Gutauskas OWHA Linesperson
Amy Laroche BC Hockey Linesperson
Cianna Lieffers Hockey Saskatchewan Referee
Amy Martin Hockey Manitoba Referee
Shauna Neary Hockey Nova Scotia Referee
Sophie Thomson Hockey Nova Scotia Linesperson
Erin Zach OWHA Linesperson

The officiating coach for the men’s U Cup will Marc Maisonneuve (Gatineau, QC). The officiating coach for the Women’s U SPORTS Championship will be Vanessa Stratton (Windsor, ON).

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Life between the lines

A late starter in hockey, Ali Beres didn’t let that stand in her way of reaching her goals and setting herself up for a successful second act as one of Canada’s top young linespersons

Katie Brickman
|
March 08, 2024

Once Ali Beres sets her sights on a goal, she will most likely accomplish it.

Switching from ringette to hockey to transitioning to officiating after her U SPORTS hockey career and embracing other athletic pursuits, Beres’ determination keeps her chasing new goals.

“I’m lucky to have athletics be a huge part of my life growing up,” says the 27-year-old. “I feel very fortunate to be involved in sports and at the level that I am with the opportunities I’ve had.”

Growing up in Lions Bay, B.C., about 30 minutes from Vancouver, Beres and her sister Maegan played ringette as there were no girls’ hockey programs. When she was 13 years old, she switched to hockey, intending to play at the university level.

Transitioning from ringette to hockey required Beres to learn new skills, including stickhandling and shooting the puck.

“When I switched from playing ringette to hockey, there was a skill and knowledge gap,” she says.

A coach told her that she was behind her peers at that age and probably shouldn’t bother, but her drive led her to participate in skill development camps and shooting 200 pucks in the family garage so she would be able to play.

“I remember that conversation with this coach when I was 14 years old. That moment shaped me and who I am today,” says Beres. “It taught me that if you want something badly and you put in the effort and hard work and you have the determination, you can still achieve your goals. Most importantly, to never give up on something you love.”

That love and passion led her on a successful hockey path, including playing for B.C. at the 2013 National Women’s Under-18 Championship and varsity hockey at Western University in London, Ontario, where she won a U SPORTS national title in 2015, a silver medal at nationals and two Ontario University Athletics (OUA) championships.

As Beres finished her university career, she thought about what would come next. She knew she wanted to stay involved in the game and leaned on an aspect of the game she used to participate in – officiating.

“I wasn’t ready to just hang up the skates and call it quits after my U SPORTS career. The rink has been a part of my life since I was three,” she says. “As soon as the final game ended, it was so emotional. I knew after that I was going to have to get a job and that I wasn’t going to be playing anymore. I remembered that I loved officiating growing up.”

Beres decided she wanted to put on a new jersey, play on a new team and see where officiating could take her. After graduating, she got re-certified in Ontario.

“I just kept skating lots of games with so many different people and games as possible and learn as much as I could,” she says. “I saw so many people ahead of me in the program and saw all their accomplishments and telling my mentors that those are the assignments that I’d love to take on.”

Since transitioning to officiating, Beres has had the opportunity to participate in the Hockey Canada Officials Program of Excellence (OPOE), which is a performance pathway for officials to reach their high-level goals.

Since then, she has been a linesperson at some significant events, including the 2014 IIHF U18 Women’s World Championship (Division 1B) and the Professional Women’s Hockey League Battle on Bay Street game between Toronto and Montreal earlier this year.

“I’m grateful to have had so many opportunities through officiating,” says Beres. “What I love about officiating is that you’re still part of the game. It’s intense … there’s pressure on your shoulders and you’re still competing as an athlete. It is our job to make sure the game is played fair and safe.”

Beres wouldn’t be able to balance life as a solution engineer with a procurement company, officiating and competing in triathlons without the support system of her family, particularly Maegan.

“We are best friends and we’ve always been competitive,” she said. “We’ve always tried to push each other. Our parents instilled solid values in us. While we were competitive, we also supported each other, and knowing that each other’s successes doesn’t mean the other isn’t successful.”

Like Ali, Maegan had hockey aspirations that she was determined to achieve. She played NCAA hockey for Boston College and with the Toronto Six of the Premier Hockey Federation, and won a silver medal with Canada at the 2017 IIHF U18 Women’s World Championship.

“We’ve always been super close, and she turned into such a big role model for me and being the younger sister, you kind of idolize your big sister,” says Maegan. “When I had a lot of success in my hockey career, she was one of the closest people to me and I always leaned on her for advice and support.”

Being athletically fit is important to stay at high-level hockey pace, but it also helps Ali stay mentally fresh and healthy and able to balance her professional career as well. Outside of officiating, Ali competes in triathlons, a sport she quickly fell in love with.

“The players are giving 100 per cent, so we need to be able to match that and give it our all too. I was a little bored of the gym, so I wanted to push my athletic comfort zone, so I signed up for an Ironman 70.3 (also known as a half-Ironman) and I got really addicted,” Ali says.

As Ali continues to set goals for herself – including officiating at the Olympics, her sister knows her drive is what will get her there.

“Once she has a glimpse of that goal, I just know she will do everything in her power to get there and accomplish it,” says Maegan. “I am very proud of her and what she’s accomplished and seeing her transition from her playing career in hockey into officiating. I’m excited to see where this journey takes her.”

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Officials chosen for high performance camps

91 officials selected to attend Officiating Program of Excellence for 2023-24 season

Dan Hanoomansingh
|
January 29, 2024

Nearly 100 officials from coast to coast to coast have been selected to attend Hockey Canada Officiating Program of Excellence (OPOE) camps.

Sixty-one officials were chosen for regional identification camps, with a further 30 attending the prestigious National High Performance Selection Camp. Additionally, the Women’s Officiating Program of Excellence will continue for its second year.

“We are excited to provide this opportunity for our top officials to compete at the national level,” says Dan Hanoomansingh, manager of officiating with Hockey Canada. “Our regional camps provide officials with an introduction to the national level and prepare them to compete for national assignments at the U18 level.

“We are thrilled to continue the Women’s Officiating Program of Excellence for a second year and are grateful for the support of the Hockey Canada Foundation, as a presenting partner, without whom this would not be possible.”

The OPOE is the pathway through which Canadian officials are selected for top national and international assignments. The objectives are to provide a clear developmental pathway for aspiring elite officials, provide developmentally appropriate coaching for elite officials, prepare officials for national and international competitions, and assist Hockey Canada in making evidence-based decisions for national and international events. Officials enter the OPOE through regional identification camps, based on nominations from their Member programs.

The 30 officials who will attend the National High Performance Selection Camp will participate in an intensive four-day experience intended to help them develop the tools needed to succeed at an elite level. They were part of a months-long evaluation process, including input from their respective Member programs and leagues, prior to a final selection by Hockey Canada.

“An invitation for the National High Performance Selection Camp represents years of hard work and dedication to the craft of officiating,” says Hanoomansingh. “These officials have worked tirelessly to hone their skills and are now ready to join our top group of officials and compete with the best in the world.”

Upon successful completion of the camp, the officials will join the national high-performance program and compete for Junior A and senior national championships, as well as international assignments.

National High Performance Selection Camp (Calgary, AB – Feb. 1-4)

Name

Member

Role

Josh Albinati

BC Hockey

Referee

Gillian Allan

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Linesperson

Tara Benard-Rae

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Referee

Ali Beres

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Linesperson

Brian Birkhoff

Ontario Hockey Federation

Linesperson

Mathieu Boudreau

Hockey Québec

Referee

Hayley Butz

Hockey Alberta

Referee

Cynthia Côté

Hockey Manitoba

Referee

Elizabeth Dornstauder

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

Maxime Ferland

Hockey Québec

Linesperson

Audrey-Anne Girard

Hockey Québec

Referee

Nick Grenier

Hockey Manitoba

Linesperson

Alex Homer

Hockey Alberta

Referee

Darby Hucaluk

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Referee

Chad Ingalls

Ontario Hockey Federation

Referee

Ryan Jenken

Ontario Hockey Federation

Referee

Yannick Jobin-Manseau

Hockey Québec

Referee

Brendan Kane

Ontario Hockey Federation

Referee

William Kelly

Hockey Québec

Referee

Anthony Lapointe

Hockey Québec

Linesperson

Amy Laroche

BC Hockey

Linesperson

Jarrod Lucoe

BC Hockey

Referee

Bob Millette

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

Harrison O'Pray

Hockey New Brunswick

Referee

Luke Pye

Ontario Hockey Federation

Linesperson

Wyatt Rapsky

Hockey Manitoba

Referee

Jack Robinson

Hockey PEI

Referee

Ty Skene

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

Mason Stewart

Hockey Alberta

Referee

Brennan Walker

BC Hockey

Linesperson

The staff for the National High Performance Camp include Hanoomansingh, Dr. David Hancock, Megan Howes, Steve Lidstone, Pat Malloy, Kevin Muench, Todd Robinson and Vanessa Stratton.


Women’s Atlantic Regional Camp (Halifax, NS – Sept. 14-17)

Name

Member

Role

Brianna Bolivar

Hockey Nova Scotia

Referee

Bailey Carr

Hockey PEI

Linesperson

Lauren Clark

Hockey Nova Scotia

Linesperson

Rachel Hopkins

Hockey NL

Referee

Shannon Ivey

Hockey NL

Referee

Jenna Leighton

Hockey Nova Scotia

Referee

Blaire MacKinnon

Hockey Nova Scotia

Linesperson

Alexis Ouellet

Hockey PEI

Referee

Leah Rideout

Hockey NL

Linesperson

Mykaela Sherry

Hockey Nova Scotia

Linesperson

Jennifer Stewart

Hockey PEI

Referee

Megan Sullivan

Hockey New Brunswick

Linesperson

The officiating coaches are Gabrielle Ariano-Lortie, Meghan MacTavish and Shauna Neary.


Men’s West Regional Camp (Calgary, AB – Sept. 26-29)

Name

Member

Role

Ethan Crawford

BC Hockey

Linesperson

Kaden Fiacco

Hockey Saskatchewan

Linesperson

Michel Fournier

Hockey Manitoba

Linesperson

Cameron Fynney

Ontario Hockey Federation

Referee

Josh Grimm

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

Cameron Halter

Hockey Alberta

Linesperson

Brandon Koop

BC Hockey

Referee

Matthew Lattimer

Hockey Alberta

Linesperson

Carson McDonald

Hockey Manitoba

Referee

Carter McKnight

Ontario Hockey Federation

Linesperson

Shane Steenhoek

Ontario Hockey Federation

Referee

Jesse Wood-Schatz

Hockey Alberta

Referee

The officiating coaches are Hanoomansingh, CJ Senkow and Colin Watt.


Men’s East Regional Camp (Sherbrooke, QC – Oct. 26-29)

Name

Member

Role

Alex Allain

Hockey New Brunswick

Linesperson

Maxime Carré

Hockey Québec

Linesperson

Simon Cholette

Hockey Québec

Referee

Antoine Dénommé

Hockey Québec

Referee

Justin Deveau

Hockey Nova Scotia

Referee

Nicolas Gaudet

Hockey New Brunswick

Referee

William Kelly

Hockey Québec

Referee

Joey Kramar

Hockey Eastern Ontario

Linesperson

Julien Lapointe

Hockey Québec

Referee

Olivier Lapointe

Hockey Québec

Linesperson

Cole Sellers

Hockey Nova Scotia

Linesperson

Kalib Snow

Hockey PEI

Referee

The officiating coaches are François Fortin, Marc Maisonneuve, Peter Moraitis and Kirk Wood.


Women’s Central Regional Camp (Montréal, QC – Nov. 11-13)

Name

Member

Role

Laurie-Anne Éthier

Hockey Québec

Linesperson

Catherine Fournier

Hockey Québec

Referee

Bailey Kennedy

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Referee

Daphnée Lemay

Hockey Québec

Referee

Raphaëlle Locas

Hockey Québec

Referee

Michelle Ngan

Hockey Québec

Linesperson

Francesca Pedulla

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Linesperson

Abiguèle Perreault

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Referee

Hailey Perreault

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Linesperson

Shadei Saadé

Hockey Québec

Referee

Marlowe Schott

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Linesperson

Evelyn Wilson

Ontario Women's Hockey Association

Linesperson

The officiating coaches are Ariano-Lortie, Stéphanie Campbell and Theresa Llorente.


Women’s West Regional Camp (Regina, SK – Dec. 7-10)

Name

Member

Role

Karissa Alford

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

Emma Benoit

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

Cassidy Brand

Hockey Alberta

Linesperson

Hailey Cromie

Hockey Manitoba

Linesperson

Julianne Desjardins

BC Hockey

Referee

Lindsey Ducharme

Hockey Alberta

Linesperson

Dana Edamura

BC Hockey

Referee

Jessica Hammer

Hockey Alberta

Linesperson

Emily Hill

Hockey Alberta

Referee

Annika Kohlman

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

Taylor Pearson

BC Hockey

Linesperson

Kassandra Speicher-Cook

BC Hockey

Linesperson

Katie Watson

Hockey Saskatchewan

Referee

The officiating coaches are Stratton and Ashley Desjardins.

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Team Canada West wins gold medal at 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge

Team Canada East gets silver medal; United States wins bronze

NR.097.23
|
December 18, 2023

TRURO, Nova Scotia – For the first time since 2017, Team Canada West has won the gold medal at the World Junior A Hockey Challenge, claiming its sixth gold with a 7-2 win over Team Canada East on Sunday at the Rath Eastlink Community Centre.

Jack Silverberg (Sherwood Park, AB/Okotoks, AJHL) opened the scoring 1:10 into the game, setting the table for a seven-goal outburst from Canada West, the most goals scored in the gold medal game since the United States scored seven in 2008.

Ronan Buckberger (Saskatoon, SK/Nipawin, SJHL) and Matthew Van Blaricom (Southey, SK/Humboldt, SJHL) each scored twice, while Erick Roest (Lethbridge, AB/Sherwood Park, AJHL) turned aside 30 shots for the win.

“This win today truly shows the character of this team,” said Canada West head coach Scott Barney (Oshawa, ON/Humboldt, SJHL). “We had a tough start to this tournament, but we had some deep heart-to-heart conversations with the players and staff and we got everyone pulling on the same rope. Guys bought in to the right way to play and this is a great feeling.”

Canada West snuck into the playoff round with only a single win in the preliminary round, before stunning the undefeated United States in overtime in Saturday’s semifinals.

Jack Silverberg (Sherwood Park, AB/Okotoks, AJHL), Nathan Brown (Winnipeg, MB/Niverville, MJHL) and Layne Loomer (Lethbridge, AB/Blackfalds, AJHL) rounded out the scoring for Canada West.           

“This is an amazing feeling,” said Van Blaricom. “It is hard to believe really with how we started this tournament, but it’s truly crazy how far we came as a team to get to this point. When you look around that [dressing] room, we knew we had a tough road to get here, but all we needed was a chance and we made it count.”

Trevor Hoskin (Bellville, ON/Cobourg, OJHL) and Vincent Gauthier (St-Zotique, QC/Valleyfield, LHJAAAQ) scored for Canada East, which collected its eighth silver medal.

Full gold medal game stats are available HERE on the Hockey Canada website.

Earlier Sunday, the United States earned its fourth bronze medal with an 8-5 win over Sweden. Trevor Connelly scored four goals, including a hat trick in the first period, to power the U.S. to victory. Connelly because just the third player to score four goals in a game at the tournament, joining Kyle Turris (2006) and Ty Daneault (2022).

For more information on the 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge, please visit HockeyCanada.ca or follow along via social media on InstagramFacebook or X.

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Canada East’s Simon Mullen at the 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge.

Truro born, Truro raised, Truro proud

From U7 hockey to the Truro Bearcats to Team Canada East, Simon Mullen is representing his hometown at the 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge

Jonathan Yue
|
December 12, 2023

He’ll wear the Maple Leaf for the first time this week, but Simon Mullen is no stranger to the World Junior A Hockey Challenge.

“When I was in my second year of [U13], I volunteered with my brother Owen and his [U15] team as part of the ice crew for the tournament in 2017,” Mullen recalls. “It was a huge experience for me, especially at that young age. I would look up and see these junior guys and think they’re so much older and see how good they are, and now here I am in that position.”

Mullen is the lone local product to crack the Team Canada East lineup for the 2023 edition of the tournament, and just the second Bearcat ever – joining Stephen Horyl, who had a goal and four points in four games to help East to silver in 2008.

But unlike Horyl, who came to the Maritime Hockey League (MHL) team by way of River Ryan, Nova Scotia, Mullen is Truro through and through – a born and raised product of the community, on and off the ice.



From learning to skate at the local Deuville’s Rink to his first years of U7 hockey with the Truro and Area Minor Hockey Association, the 18-year-old has spent all but one year of his career at home – he played the 2020-21 season with the Pictou County Majors of the Nova Scotia U18 Major Hockey League.

“Truro is a special place,” the defenceman says. “I’ve played every single year of hockey here except one, so to have a chance to play at an international level, this is special.”

Never one known for his offensive contributions from the blue line, Mullen has instead focused on work ethic and playing the right way in his own zone. But the offence has started to come this season – his 20 points (1-19—20) in 23 games are as many as he had in 82 games combined in his first two seasons with the Bearcats.

He also played his 100th MHL game a few weeks ago, becoming the youngest defenceman in Bearcats history to reach the century mark.

His improvement is most evident to the ones who have seen his career evolve.

“He has a quiet confidence in him that allows him to be proud of what he’s accomplishing,” says Ainsley Mullen, Simon’s mother. “The fact that he’s chosen to stay home is an added feather in the cap and shows that he’s proud to be from here and represent the Bearcats. This full-circle opportunity to represent Team Canada in Truro is a pat on his back for that commitment to play at such a high level while staying in Truro.”

Despite getting that taste of international hockey six years ago, when he had a front-row seat to Team Canada West claiming its most recent World Junior A Challenge gold medal at the Rath Eastlink Community Centre, Mullen wasn’t sure where hockey would take him.

It wasn’t until his rookie season with the Bearcats in 2021-22 that everything truly began to fall into place.

“In my 16-year-old year, I didn’t have many goals or expectations, but I ended up playing a lot of games around really good coaches and leaders and they led the way for me,” Mullen recalls of helping Truro reach the MHL final. “Now as I’m older, I want to bring those habits and work ethic into my game now and work with the younger guys and in the community.”

Talking to Mullen, there’s that one word that keeps coming up – community. He knows he wouldn’t be where he is without the people around him, and he has never hesitated to give back to a town that has long been behind him.

He volunteers his time alongside his Bearcats teammates with local minor hockey programs during the season, and pays it forward in the summer when he’s not working at the local golf course.

But there’s no better way to say thank you to Truro than by giving his all during the World Junior A Hockey Challenge, and hopefully adding a gold medal – which would be the first ever for Team Canada East.

“There’s no words to explain the moment I step on the ice with Canada here,” Mullen says. “Seeing all the kids with the signs and looking down at the logo on the jersey, it’s just something you dream of. I’m going to do my best out there and hopefully open some eyes.”

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Mitchell Garrett guards the net against Czechia at the Para Hockey Cup.

Perseverance pays off for Team Canada puck-stopper

After years of hard work and dedication to return to the ice after an ATV accident, Mitchell Garrett will don the Maple Leaf for the first time on the international stage

Shannon Coulter
|
December 05, 2023

Being a goaltender is in Mitchell Garrett’s DNA. No matter what sport he plays, he always wants to be the last line of defence.

After playing as a catcher in baseball and a goaltender in soccer growing up, the Surrey, B.C., product began playing hockey at 10 years old.

“My dad grew up as a soccer player,” Garrett says. “Telling him that I wanted to switch into hockey was not necessarily the news he wanted to hear.”

Garrett played between the pipes for 12 years, usually in house league or occasionally in rep. After high school, he continued to play recreationally with some of his minor hockey teammates.

“I remember when my accident happened, it was like a month before the new season started,” the 29-year-old says. “So that was a shock to them hearing that I wasn’t going to be able to play for them ever again.”

On July 29, 2017, Garrett was camping when he decided to take a friend’s ATV for a drive. When he didn’t return, a search party found Garrett had crashed on the side of the road.

He was airlifted to Vancouver General Hospital and diagnosed with a T4 complete spinal cord injury. Despite his prognosis, Garrett progressed quickly and completed rehabilitation within three months.

“It was a really fast process. I remember everybody telling me this is going much faster than what it’s typically supposed to,” he says. “I really wanted to make myself goal-oriented when I was in rehab because I didn’t want to be there. I just wanted to get going in my life, and I knew it was going to be a major change.”

Matteo Pellizzari (left), Mitchell Garrett and Brendon Hurst smile in their sleds on the ice during selection camp.Matteo Pellizzari (left), Mitchell Garrett and Brendon Hurst.

Throughout the entire process, hockey was always on Garrett’s mind.

“I don’t remember my injury at all. I woke up in the hospital and I’m like, ‘Where am I right now?’ [They told me I’m] in the hospital, and I was like, ‘Oh, well I have a playoff game tonight, I need to go play hockey.’”

Now paralyzed from the chest down after his injury, Garrett immediately shifted his focus to how he could get back on the ice and began researching para hockey.

“I studied [Team Canada goaltender] Dom Larocque. I watched every single interview I could find of him,” he explains. “I remember watching it three or four times over and pausing on the on-ice clips, just really analyzing his setup and trying to figure it out for myself. [He] was a huge inspiration.”

More than nine months after his accident, Garrett returned to the ice and got back in net—this time in a sled.

“It was pretty monumental for me getting back to being a goaltender. My parents were there; my dad was on the ice and my mom was watching,” Garrett recalls. “I remember that skate, I just looked like a fish out of water.

“When I got off the ice, my mom was just like, ‘Is this for you? Do you really want to do this? It looks like you’re struggling out there.’ I just told her eventually it will be smooth, and everything will be good.”

Although he was back on the ice, his new reality did present some challenges for playing para hockey. Without the ability to move anything below his chest, it provided some limitations for being a goaltender again.

“[Other goalies] have their entire core to use and they have their legs and their knees to stand up on. I remember everybody telling me how much of a disadvantage I was at, [but I] never even consider that a disadvantage for a second,” he says. “We’re still playing the same game. We’re still going after the same goal.”

Mitchell with his dad, Ken Garrett.

Garrett set his eyes on his next goal—earning a spot on Canada’s National Para Hockey Team—and got to work. After every ice time, he would look at his sled setup and make adjustments.

“I have a shed at my place and that’s like the tool shed. That’s where all the hard work off the ice goes down, just to ensure I’m in tip-top shape when I’m out there,” he says. “I was consistently tweaking my sled for the longest time; moving it up, moving it down, figuring out where my blades go.”

His home rink, the Langley Sportsplex, provided free ice time so he could practice throughout the year. On the ice, Garrett’s dad Ken joined him to be a shooter for his practices and he became the head coach of British Columbia’s para hockey team.

“I know I wouldn’t be able to do it without him,” Garrett says. “My dad has been an enormous help throughout this entire process, making sure that it’s the most enjoyable for me.”

His hard work on and off the ice began to pay off, and Garrett was invited to participate in his first selection camp with Canada’s National Para Hockey Team ahead of the 2022-23 season.

“It’s always good to have somebody involved that has experience playing the position and the game prior to their accident,” says Russ Herrington, head coach of Canada’s National Para Hockey Team. “That was the one thing that we noticed right away with Mitch was that both glove hands and his ability to track the puck, that was something that transferred over from his previous experience.”

“It didn’t really go as I planned,” Garrett says about selection camp. “To be honest, it wasn’t a great showing for me. I think maybe I was a little starstruck at the camp. [I had never] played with these caliber players and these are players who I’ve wanted to play with for so long.”

After camp concluded, Garrett took the experience to heart and got back to training even harder for his next opportunity.

“I just told myself that I’m starting to trend in the right direction and just to stay on track and continue what I was doing because I noticed that it was working for me,” Garrett says.

Corbyn Smith (left) and Mitchell Garrett celebrate after beating Czechia at the 2023 Para Hockey Cup.

When he returned to selection camp in September, his improvements were evident to the coaching staff.

“I think he’s more comfortable in a sled,” Herrington says. “I think he was a little timid [getting to the top of the crease] early on, and now we see him be a little more assertive in his positioning and challenging the shooter.”

After dreaming of making Team Canada for over six years, Garrett finally got the phone call that he would be making his international debut at the 2023 Para Hockey Cup in Quispamsis, New Brunswick.

“That’s one of the best parts of this job is delivering that type of news. We’re really excited to have him here with us,” Herrington says. “Our veterans do such a good job of celebrating opportunities like that because it wasn’t too long ago that they were donning the jersey for the first time.”

“From my family to my friends to my girlfriend, everybody has really played a part in this process,” Garrett says. “That was a really cool moment on the phone (telling my parents I made the team); you could just feel how proud [my dad] was through the phone.

“For my mom, after that first ice time with her being like ‘Is this right for you,’ and then being able to tell her that I made the team—it was a full-circle moment.”

In Quispamsis, Garrett is looking forward to putting on the Maple Leaf for the first time, playing on the international stage and hopefully inspiring more members of the paraplegic community to start playing para hockey.

“I have to hold back my tears every single time I think about it because [playing for Team Canada] is a goal that I’ve had since I was eight,” he says. “Most people consider other sports just because of my disability… I’m very excited to be changing that narrative.”

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Canada East and Canada West rosters named for 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge

44 players named to Canadian entries for return of international event to Truro

NR.089.23
|
December 01, 2023

CALGARY, Alberta – Team Canada East and Team Canada West have announced their final rosters ahead of the 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge, and 44 of the top Junior A players in Canada will wear the Maple Leaf in Truro, Nova Scotia, Dec. 10-17 .

The players named to Canada East were selected from the five eastern leagues in the Canadian Junior Hockey League (CJHL) - the Northern Ontario Junior Hockey League (NOJHL), Ontario Junior Hockey League (OJHL), Central Canada Hockey League (CCHL), Ligue de hockey junior AAA du Québec (LHJAAAQ) and Maritime Hockey League (MHL). Canada West selected its players from CJHL’s four western leagues - the Alberta Junior Hockey League (AJHL), Manitoba Junior Hockey League (MJHL), Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL) and Superior International Junior Hockey League (SIJHL).

Canada East’s 22-player roster was selected by head coach Billy McGuigan (Summerside, PE/Summerside, MHL) , alongside director of operations Chris Vanstone (Mississauga, ON/Ontario Junior Hockey League) . Assistant coaches Peter Goulet (Kingston, ON/Powassan, NOJHL) , Derek Smith (Belleville, ON/Trenton, OJHL) and Josh Hardiman (Montréal, QC/Powassan, NOJHL) also provided input.

“We feel the team we have assembled gives us an excellent opportunity to be competitive every game,” said Canada East head coach Billy McGuigan, “There is a tremendous amount of talent across this country and narrowing it down to two teams of twenty-two players is no easy task. Our staff and this group of players is eager to play for a gold medal on the world stage in Atlantic Canada.”

Canada West’s 22-player roster was selected by head coach Scott Barney (Oshawa, ON/Humboldt, SJHL) and director of operations Nigel Dube (Lampman, SK/Lloydminster, AJHL) , alongside assistant coaches Alex Mandolidis (Calgary, AB/Winnipeg, MJHL), Kelvin Cech (Edmonton, AB/Niverville, MJHL), and video coach Bryan Arneson (Sherwood Park, AB/Canmore, AJHL).

“Our staff has done a great job of identifying the top players in Western Canada,” said Canada West head coach Scott Barney, “We are excited to get to Nova Scotia and compete against the world. This is an amazing opportunity for these young men and something we as a staff want to reiterate every day. It is not every day you get to wear the maple leaf so take advantage of it, enjoy it, and play the game that got you here.”

In addition to the 44 players, the support staff that will work with Canada East and Canada West at the World Junior A Hockey Challenge have been announced.

  • Athletic therapist Leah Toffelmire (Treton, ON/Trenton, OJHL)
  • Athletic therapist / Equipment manager Samantha Delsing (Cochrane, AB/Drumheller, AJHL)
  • Physiotherapist Justin Giesbrecht (Niverville, MB/Niverville, MJHL)
  • Physiotherapist / Equipment manager Caitlin McCuaig (Frankford, ON/Wellington, OJHL
  • Equipment managers Carmelo Pugliese (Ottawa, ON/Ottawa, CCJHL) and Jason Savill (Leduc, AB/Flin Flon, SJHL)

Canada West will kick off the 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge against Sweden on Dec. 10 at 3:30 p.m. AT, followed by Canada East facing off against Slovakia at 7:30 p.m. AT. The top four teams will advance to the playoff round, with the medal games taking place at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. AT on Dec. 17.

TSN and RDS, the official broadcast partners of Hockey Canada, will broadcast the gold medal game. All preliminary-round games, both semifinals and the bronze medal game will be livestreamed at HockeyCanada.ca .

The 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge represents a partnership between Hockey Canada, the Canadian Junior Hockey League (CJHL), Hockey Nova Scotia, NHL Central Scouting and the local organizing committee. The five-team format includes Team Canada East, Team Canada West, Slovakia, Sweden and the United States.

Full-event ticket packages for the 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge are now available for $192 and can be purchased at HockeyCanada.ca/Tickets . The package includes one ticket to all 14 games, including both medal games.

For more information on Hockey Canada and the 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge, please visit HockeyCanada.ca , or follow along via social media on Facebook , X and Instagram .

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Memories of Truro

Before the World Junior A Challenge returns to Nova Scotia, members of gold medal-winning Canada West take a look back at their 2017 triumph

Jonathan Yue
|
November 20, 2023

From Zack Rose’s dominant performances between the pipes to Dylan Holloway’s international impact as a 16-year-old and Jacob Bernard-Docker’s steady confidence on the blue line, there are plenty of memorable moments from the last time the World Junior A Hockey Challenge came to Truro, Nova Scotia, in 2017.

The trio played key roles in leading Canada West to the gold medal, and the experience on the East Coast has stayed with them as they’ve moved on in their hockey journeys.

Rose – who earned MVP honours in 2017 – is in his fifth year of NCAA eligibility with Augustana University, having fashioned a 20-10-4 record in the college games; Holloway went 14th overall to the Edmonton Oilers in the 2020 NHL Draft; and Bernard-Docker was the 26th pick by the Ottawa Senators in 2018.

But what ended up as a golden moment for Canada West didn’t start very well at all; losses to Czechia and the United States left the westerners 0-2 in preliminary-round play and needing to find their game with the playoff round looming.

“We had a rocky start, but we figured things out after the round robin,” Bernard-Docker says. “Having that necessary step of losing those first two games, the team came together as a tight knit group and had fun, really enjoyed the home crowd and turned it around.”




The winless prelims set up an all-Canadian matchup in the quarterfinals against Canada East. West got off to a strong start, with Holloway finding captain Carter Turnbull in the slot to open the scoring six minutes into the game before Bernard-Docker joined the offence 67 seconds into the second period when his his centre-ice dump took a bounce off the end boards and past Canada East goaltender Jett Alexander.

Canada East wouldn’t back down, taking the lead in the third period when Nick Campoli and Jack McBain (a 2022 Olympian) gave it a 3-2 advantage, but Ross Armour tied the game with 6:31 left in regulation before scoring the overtime winner 42 seconds into the extra period to second West on to the semifinals.

The semifinal proved that Canada West was getting better as the games got more important, as it avenged its prelim loss by defeating the Czechs 5-1 . The game was a goaltending battle early, with Rose and Milan Kloucek combining to stop 36 of 37 shots through 40 minutes.

Zdenek Sendek tied things midway through the third period, but Angus Crookshank restored the West advantage 41 seconds after that, and Holloway, Brett Stapley and Brendan Budy helped the Canadians pull away late.

The semifinal success set up a gold medal game showdown against the United States, which had claimed four of the previous five tournament titles.

“The rivalry between U.S and Canada, nothing compares to that rivalry, and that’s something you dream of being in as a kid,” Rose says. “To be a part of that and dominate against them, it speaks to the talent we had on that roster and the leadership of the coaching staff. To come out on top, we played one game at a time and we didn’t look back once we had the opportunity in front of us.”



Brendan Budy got the festivities started with a shorthanded marker midway through the first period, and Crookshank and Corey Andonovski pushed the Canadian advantage to 3-0 by the 12:15 mark of the second. The Americans got one back before the intermission, but Armour and Holloway capped the scoring and finish off a 5-1 victory .

Rose saved his best for the playoff round; he stopped 79 of 84 (a .940 save percentage) in wins over East, the Czechs and Americans, capped by a spectacular 35-save effort in the gold medal game, where West was outshot 36-19.

“The experience was electric throughout the time in Truro, and especially for the final game against the U.S,” Holloway says. “It was my first time in the Maritimes, the crowd was packed, everyone was cheering for us. To play the way I did, it was an honour to play for Canada and put me on the radar with all the eyes that come to the tournament.”

Bernard-Docker adds, “At that point, I just wanted to improve and get better after my first year with Okotoks [in the AJHL] and prepare myself the best I could for college. That tournament put me on the map and helped me gain confidence, realizing I could play with the best players around.”

Rose is forever grateful for the opportunity to represent his country. Offering his advice for those playing in the tournament, he hopes players take time to soak in the whole experience.

“For most people, it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Rose says. “Take in every moment because it’s so special to play for Canada. Beyond that, I was a player who didn’t have a [college] commitment going into that tournament, but playing a few good games turned that around and I got offered a scholarship to go to Bowling Green and I gained the confidence and the lessons from the coaching staff to play at that level.”

The World Junior A Hockey Challenge continues to be a tournament that sets a foundation for a lucky few Junior A players across the country. Not only do players gain experience, but they have memories to cherish for a lifetime.

“Thinking of all the history with that logo on your chest, nothing can beat it,” Rose says. “Being able to represent millions of Canadians on the world stage, there is no better hockey country than Canada, and to be able to be one of the lucky people to wear that jersey, there is no better feeling. It gives me chills just thinking back to it.”

The 2023 World Junior A Hockey Challenge gets underway Dec. 10 at the Rath Eastlink Community Centre. Looking to be part of the festivities in Truro? Tickets are now on sale at HockeyCanada.ca/Tickets .

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Canada White atop podium at 2023 World Under-17 Hockey Challenge

United States takes silver medal, Sweden wins bronze

NR.079.23
|
November 12, 2023

CHARLOTTETOWN, Prince Edward Island – For the first time since 2015, Canada White has won the gold medal at the World Under-17 Hockey Challenge, needing overtime to get past the United States 2-1 in the gold medal game Saturday night at a sold-out Eastlink Centre in Charlottetown.

Cameron Schmidt (Prince George, BC/Vancouver, WHL) was the overtime hero for the Canadians, chasing down a loose puck in the neutral zone and tucking a backhand around U.S. goaltender Patrick Quinlan 9:18 into the extra period.

“I kind of just blanked out, I just went to the backhand and it found its way in,” said Schmidt.Obviously this team was thrown together, but building that bond from the start and carrying it to the end of this tournament was a big thing. These are my brothers for life, and it was an amazing experience.”

Canada White took the early lead just 98 seconds into the game when Joby Baumuller (Wilcox, SK/Brandon, WHL) redirected a centring pass from Ethan Czata (Brampton, ON/Niagara, OHL) past Quinlan.

It remained a one-goal game until 9:49 of the third period when Charlie Trethewey pulled the Americans even on the power play. The cross-border rivals would trade chances, but the game would need overtime to decide a champion, setting up the Schmidt heroics.

“We really talked about wanting to get better every game,” said Canada White head coach John Dean (Don Mills, ON/Sault Ste. Marie, OHL). “I was very fortunate to experience a very difficult game at the [2023 IIHF U18 World Championship]. As coaches we’re learning as well and my first game in Switzerland we lost 8-1 and we ended up winning a bronze medal. I took some notes from the coach at the time, Jeff Truitt, on how to handle it and stay even keel and realize you don’t win a gold medal in the first game.

“The message to the rest of the group was we’re going to get better every single day. We went to overtime five times, only won one game in regulation; these guys went into the final game and had experienced everything – blowing leads, comebacks, shootouts, overtime wins, coaches being upset and being happy. They went through it all so I couldn’t ask for a better tournament because they got to experience it all and I think there’s a lot of growth here.”

Sweden earns bronze medal

In the bronze medal game on Saturday afternoon, Sweden used a three-goal second period to defeat Czechia 6-3.

Czechia held a slim one-goal advantage after the opening frame on a power-play goal from Tomas Poletin. A shorthanded tally by Milton Gästrin midway through the second period pulled the Swedes even. They would add two more before the period ended to lead 3-1.

The Czechs would add a pair of goals just over a minute apart, but a goal by Ivar Stenberg at 3:39 held up as the eventual game-winner.

Following the gold medal game, the tournament all-star team was announced. 

Forward: Émile Guité (Chambly, QC/Chicoutimi, LHJMQ) - Canada White
Forward: Gavin McKenna (Whitehorse, YT/Medicine Hat, WHL) - Canada Red
Forward: Will Moore - United States
Defence: Matthew Schaefer (Stoney Creek, ON/Erie, OHL) - Canada White
Defence: Charlie Trethewey - United States
Goaltender: Jack Ivankovic (Mississauga, ON/Mississauga, OHL) - Canada White 

For more information on the 2023 World Under-17 Hockey Challenge, please visit HockeyCanada.ca or follow through social media on Facebook and X.

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For more information:

Esther Madziya
Manager, Communications
Hockey Canada

(403) 284-6484 

[email protected] 

Spencer Sharkey
Manager, Communications
Hockey Canada

(403) 777-4567

[email protected]

Jeremy Knight
Manager, Corporate Communications
Hockey Canada

(647) 251-9738

[email protected]

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Schedule
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Prague & Ostrava, Czechia
Date: May 10 to 26
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Edmonton, Alta., Canada
Date: Aug 3 to 10